Friday, June 3, 2022


KEYNOTE SESSION: Bridging the Practice-Research Gap with Implementation Science

Presenter(s): Dr. Natalie Douglas, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 – 8:00am - 10:00am

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: The research-to-practice and practice-to-research gaps in speech-language pathology persist; however, tools and techniques of implementation science have been beneficial in moving the needle in the right direction. In this seminar, concepts of implementation science will be introduced with a focus on clinician empowerment. Implementation strategies will be illustrated through case examples to promote the uptake of best practices in a variety of clinical settings.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will define implementation science.
  • 2.       Participants will discuss the role of the clinical SLP in contributing to the evidence base.
  • 3.       Participants will describe implementation strategies to support best practices in their practice setting.


Dysphagia & NMES: To Stim or Not to Stim

Presenter(s): Chyna Blankenship, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 8:00am - 9:30am

Location: Room 4

Session Description: The purpose of this lecture is to demonstrate understanding of the populations and diagnoses that are appropriate for the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Also provided will be definitions of common terminology related to NMES. Finally, traditional exercise approaches to pair with NMES will be discussed

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Demonstrate understanding of populations and diagnoses appropriate for NMES
  • 2.       Demonstrate understanding of NMES terms
  • 3.       Identify traditional dysphagia exercises appropriate to pair with NMES


Memory, Sensory, & Play: Feeding Interventions that Enhance Interactions with Food

Presenter(s): Cindy Herde, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 8:00am - 9:30am

Location: Room 5

Session Description: The purpose of this seminar is to illustrate how memory, sensory, and play are related and its effects on feeding in the pediatric population. We will identify ways to create food-related opportunities that positively alter sensory experiences as well as outline the curriculum and feasibility of an individual and group-based program for children with pediatric feeding disorders.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       At the culmination of the session, participants will be able to explain how sensory and play are related to memory formation, retention, and retrieval.
  • 2.       At the culmination of the session, participants will be able to list minimal four strategies to create positive memories between food and sensory play.
  • 3.       At the culmination of the session, participants will be able to implement effective and engaging activities for a pediatric feeding program.


Brain and Body health, is there a correlation between cognition, physical health and hearing loss?  

Presenter(s): Michele Hurley Au.D.  & Shelley Smith, Au.D.

Time: June 3, 2022 - 8:00am - 9:00am

Location: Room 1

Session Description:  The topic of cognition, brain and physical fitness are hot topics in the news. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with a higher risk of cognitive decline as well as many other health issues, often seen in the aging population.  This session will examine the correlation between hearing loss and many common health conditions and discuss the role that hearing technology could play in staving off the negative impacts associated with cognitive and physical decline frequently associated with the aging process.  

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will identify health issues associated with hearing loss.
  • 2.       Participants will define the role that hearing technology plays in postponing the cognitive decline associated with aging.
  • 3.       Participants will define the role that hearing technology plays in postponing the physical decline associated with aging.


Keeping patients connected with what matters most: Using mobile technology to connect the hearing aid wearer and caregivers

Presenter(s): Michele Hurley Au.D.  & Shelley Smith, Au.D.

Time: June 3, 2022 - 9:10am - 10:10am

Location: Room 1

Session Description:  Connecting the hearing aid wearer to friends and loved ones is an important part of the hearing journey. As more individuals desire to age in place and remain in their homes, the need for innovative solutions to stay connected have become a topic of discussion. The need for effective solutions to this issue became very evident during the recent pandemic. The ability to remain connected remotely creates peace of mind for both the hearing aid wearer and their loved ones. This session will examine the need for aging in place strategies, the need for remote connectivity and the benefits that the ThriveCare app can offer to establish this connection and peace of mind for hearing wearer and their loved ones.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will identify pandemic-related issues affecting hearing aid wearers.
  • 2.       The participant will define strategies to improve remote connectivity for hearing aid wearers.
  • 3.       The participant will identify benefits of the ThriveCare app for improving connection for hearing aid wearers.


Dysphagia Outreach Project: Meeting Unmet Needs

Presenter(s): Hillary Cooper, M.A., CCC-SLP & Kristen West, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: Dysphagia Outreach Project is the first of its kind 501(c)3 organization whose mission is to provide support, resources and education to individuals across the lifespan with dysphagia. In addition the organization aims to provide evidenced based education and resources to speech-language pathologists in order to positively impact the care of individuals with dysphagia. This presentation aims to provide education regarding DOP's mission and outreach efforts in addition to practical resources for clinicians to share with their patients and families who would benefit from support from this unique and visionary organization.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Identify the financial impact of dysphagia on patients and families
  • 2.       Demonstrate knowledge of how applicants apply for support from Dysphagia Outreach Project
  • 3.       Identify stressors that negatively impacts families and individuals with dysphagia


Frequent Flyer: The Patient that Keeps Coming Back - A Case Study on Compassion Fatigue and Caregiver Burnout

Presenter(s): Heather Barber, M.S. CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 4

Session Description: This presentation surrounds a case study of a patient who became a “frequent flyer,” someone who kept coming back to the hospital many times for various reasons. A discussion of compassion fatigue for the SLP, navigating advocacy for the patient during readmissions, and learning to accommodate for any acute changes in the patient. Examples of assessments and treatments of this patient will be provided throughout the hospital course. Then, turning towards learning how to build rapport with the patient and caregivers, becoming a voice for a voiceless patient, educating team members on the social dynamic of the patient and family. Signs and symptoms of caregiver burnout will be discussed, ways to assist as an SLP, and ways for the caregiver to feel more empowered in caring for the patient. Lastly, how loss of the patient affects all parties: SLP, staff, and family - learning to move forward and remain in touch.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The participant will be able to define compassion fatigue, its signs/symptoms, and ways to reduce burnout.
  • 2.       The participant will identify ways to navigate rapport and relationships with the family members for patients with frequent hospital stays.
  • 3.       The participant will learn the importance of patient advocacy and its uses with the medical team.


Feeding Tubes and Pediatric Feeding Disorders: Friends Not Foes

Presenter(s): Michelle Dawson, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Time: June 3, 2022 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 5

Session Description: Fed is fed is fed is fed!  Whether that be working with a little one who is 100% orally fed, eating some by mouth, but supplemented via nasogastric tube (NG tube), or working with a little one who is completely gastrostomy tube (G tube) dependent. As clinicians that evaluate and treat pediatric feeding disorder, we need to embrace the lifesaving roles that these tubes offer. Tubes can be our patient's friends, not foes.  This course is designed to educate clinicians new to the world of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders on the types of tubes available, what conditions/etiologies would indicate the need for alternate means of nourishment, and how to effectively use them in treatment.  Bon Appetit PFD Colleagues!
Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe the location and types of different enteral versus parenteral feeding tubes.
  • 2.       Explain common medical conditions that would indicate the need for alternate forms of nourishment.
  • 3.       Describe the role of enteral and/or parenteral feeding tubes for treatment of pediatric feeding disorder.


Using Principles of Mindfulness in School-Based Speech-Language Pathology

Presenter(s): Amanda Elias, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 1

Session Description: This presentation discusses principles of mindfulness and outlines how mindfulness is being used both in the mental health fields and in the field of speech-language pathology. Principles of mindfulness have been studied at length and exercises in mindfulness have been implemented in various fields, with a majority of fields being mental health related (psychology, psychiatry, and counseling). A quick review of the literature reveals more studies have been completed on mindfulness in adults than children, and very few studies on mindfulness being used with children diagnosed with speech and language disorders can be found. This presentation will highlight the areas in which mindfulness principles are being used in the mental health fields and in the area of speech-language pathology. This presentation also includes the gaps in which mindfulness principles could be used to positively impact children receiving speech and language services.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The participant will understand principles of mindfulness.
  • 2.       The participant will understand how mindfulness is being used in the mental health fields and in the field of speech-language pathology.
  • 3.       The participant will identify ways in which principles of mindfulness can be used in school-based speech-language therapy.


Clinical Supervision: Requirements, Processes, and Evidence

Presenter(s): Heather Anderson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Sandra Hayes, SLP.D., CCC-SLP, & Julie Smith, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: ASHA requires two hours of training for SLPs who serve as clinical supervisors for SLP graduate students.  Prospective and current supervisors may lack training or may benefit from additional learning and resources.  This presentation will include ASHA requirements for clinical supervisors, practices and procedures in clinical supervision, application of principles of evidence-based practice to supervision, and findings from a research study completed by the presenters. Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe ASHA requirements for individuals engaging in supervision of graduate students in speech-language pathology.
  • 2.       Identify resources for furthering knowledge in skills in supervision.
  • 3.       Identify tools for quantitative and qualitative data collection and student feedback.


If You Could See What I See; FEES Case Studies and Evidence Based Literature

Presenter(s): Nicole Kiel Paschke, M.S., CCC-SLP & Chelsey Gronewold, M.S., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm

Location: Room 4

Session Description: This presentation will review dysphagia, FEES and VFSS (instrumental swallow assessments) and ASHA’s stance for need of instrumentation for appropriate diagnosis and treatment plan.   We will review case studies and how they correlate with current literature and evidenced based practice. 

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Learner will be able to advocate instrumentation for patients in multiple settings for the “Platinum Standard” in patient care including ASHA’s statement on instrumentation for plan of care.
  • 2.       Learner will identify normal vs abnormal swallow function through case studies.
  • 3.       Learner will be able to identify those who would benefit from dysphagia instrumentation.


Evaluating the Evidence for interventions in Pediatric Feeding Disorder

Presenter(s): Dr. Raquel Garcia, SLP.D., CCC-SLP, CLC, CNT, BCS-S & Kristen West, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm

Location: Room 5

Session Description: This presentation will explore the evidence behind widely used interventions for infants and children with pediatric feeding disorders (PFD). As a growing area of practice in speech language pathology, many professionals struggle with fully understanding and applying the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) when selecting treatment of pediatric feeding disorders. A review of the new PFD diagnostic criteria will be provided. The principles of EBP will be defined and discussed. A review of the available external evidence for commonly used therapy interventions will be explored. Approaches will be delineated based on the level of external evidence currently available to support its usage.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Define pediatric feeding disorders.
  • 2.       Identify the three pillars of EBP as they apply to the management of PFDs.
  • 3.       Understand commonly used therapy interventions and the external evidence to support them.


Beyond The Bag: How Early Intervention SLPs can shape parent well-being to improve communication in early childhood

Presenter(s): Dr. Lauren Wright-Jones, Ph. D., CCC-SLP,  Anne Marie Sisk, M.S., CCC-SLP, & Ariana Brown, B.S.

Time: June 3, 2022 - 12:30pm - 2:30pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Early Intervention Speech-Language Pathologists must recognize that building the communication skills of preschool-aged children extends beyond once weekly therapy sessions with the child. Effective early intervention occurs when therapists work closely with caregivers to foster an environment of learning, reflection, and strengths-based coaching to meet the needs of each person in a child’s family unit. How therapists interact with parents has a direct impact on parental self-efficacy (Trivette and Dunst, 2019). The parents of young children with developmental delays including speech and language concerns are at a greater risk of experiencing increased stress and compromised mental health and wellbeing (Nygård & Clancy, 2018). Using reflective interactions to build parental capacity and aid in the detection and referral of parent mental health concerns can have a direct impact on parent well-being and improved outcomes for children in early intervention.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe ways in which parent capacity is impacted by caring for a child with speech and language concerns.
  • 2.       Define the speech-language pathology scope of practice specific to parental support in early intervention. 
  • 3.       List two approaches that speech-language pathologists can utilize to enhance and repair the parent-child bonds necessary for speech and language growth and development.


The Role of SLP with Patients on Mechanical Ventilation: From Swallowing to Speech

Presenter(s): Chyna Blankenship, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Location: Room 4

Session Description: SLPs have paved their paths on stroke units, head and neck cancer units, heart and vascular units, and so many other places within medical facilities. At times, SLPs work with some of the most medically complex patients who have tracheostomies. The question I have is why are SLPs mostly consulted after the patient is weaned from mechanical ventilation? A patient on mechanical ventilation can be appropriate for swallowing and cognitive-linguistic evaluations. The role of the SLP does not have to wait until after the patient has weaned from the mechanical ventilator. However, so many SLPs, like myself before training, feel overwhelmed and underprepared to see these patients. My goal is to provide an understanding of where to start with a patient who is on mechanical ventilation so SLPs can provide education to their counterparts at their facility why SLPs are important in the care for all patients including those on mechanical ventilation.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Identify settings on ventilator and relationship to patient's medical status.
  • 2.       Determine appropriateness for PMV trials with patients on mechanical ventilation.
  • 3.       Determine appropriate instrumental swallow study, MBSS versus FEES, for patient on mechanical ventilation.


Alternative Therapy to Reduce Anxiety During Mechanical Ventilation

Presenter(s): Dr. Kristin Dolan, SLP.D., CCC-SLP, Amber Heape; CScD, CCC-SLP, & Marilee Bresciani Ludvik; PhD

Time: June 3, 2022 - 4:10pm - 5:10pm

Location: Room 4

Session Description: Hospitalizations are a source of anxiety further exacerbated with invasive, life-sustaining equipment such as mechanical ventilation (MV). Alternative and complementary strategies have emerged as non-pharmacological approaches to address anxiety. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine what effect listening to binaural auditory beats (BAB) would have on anxiety in critically ill adults dependent on MV. This study enrolled a single participant who completed five baseline, five withdrawal sessions, and 16 separate intervention sessions. Authentic 10 hertz (Hz) alpha frequency BAB were presented via stereo headphones for a 15-minute duration. Self-reported anxiety levels were collected using an electronic visual analog scale (eVAS). Changes in anxiety level were documented from baseline to intervention, on withdrawal, and reintroduction of the intervention. Despite variable phase data and an insignificant treatment impact by visual analysis, a positive therapeutic change in anxiety trends was appreciated during each intervention phase. There is merit realized in using BAB to affect self-reported anxiety. Future exploration, however, is warranted to augment the limited research currently available, including increased sample sizes, further modified homogenous populations, and improved guidelines to support dosing variability decisions.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The attendee will be able to identify five alternative and complimentary therapies to reduce anxiety.
  • 2.       The attendee will be able to describe the basic effects of binaural auditory beats.
  • 3.       The attendee will be able to identify how anxiety parameters are manifest during mechanical ventilation.


Escaping the Silo: How to Embrace Interprofessional Practice for Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Presenter(s): Michelle Dawson, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Time: June 3, 2022 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Location: Room 5

Session Description: When working with little ones who have a pediatric feeding disorder (PFD) we are only as good as the team surrounding them on their journey.  If you’re an SLP new to the world of PFD, being part of a new interprofessional practice team can feel daunting given the variety of interprofessional practice team members you may encounter…but relax, there is joy to be found in the learning process! For the next two hours, learn about the most common specialty physicians, allied health team members, and community members found on IPP teams, their education, their roles and responsibilities on the team, and functional strategies to collaborate for optimal patient outcomes. Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe the roles and responsibilities of three different specialty physicians found on a PFD team.
  • 2.       Describe the roles and responsibilities of three different allied health and community members found on a PFD team.
  • 3.       Describe functional strategies to assist in engaging in crucial conversations for improved continuity of care between IPP Team Members.


School Leader Perceptions Regarding the Role of the SLP

Presenter(s): Dr. Dawn Guice, Ed.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 3, 2022 - 3:00pm - 4:30pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: A qualitative instrumental case study design was selected for the study on how school leaders perceived and interacted with speech-language pathologists and any barriers that affected leader perceptions. Five key themes emerged from school leader perceptions. Those included: (a) limited knowledge regarding the role of speech-language pathologists, (b) understanding of school-based challenges for speech-language pathologists, (c) limited knowledge on contributions speech-language pathologists provide, (d) school leader recognition of limited knowledge-base regarding speech-language pathologists, and (e) school leaders want to learn more about the complete role of the school-based, speech-language pathologist. Findings were interpreted relative to educational leadership, speech-language pathologists, and specific policies and practices related to school leadership.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The participant will understand the perceptions of school leaders as it pertains to the role of the SLP.
  • 2.       The participant will be able to discuss noted perceptions and how such perceptions have been continually evident within education over the past few decades.
  • 3.       The participant will be provided different ways to properly advocate for the SLP profession to bring awareness and decrease job ambiguity.


[Student Poster Session] The Deaf Community’s Perspective of ASL Use in the Hearing Community

Presenter(s): Kelsey Verdin, BS and S. Caprice Lee, PhD, CCC-SLP (sponsor)

Time: June 3, 2022 - 4:30pm - 5:00pm

Location: Main Hallway

Session Description: The Deaf culture is rooted in comradery and pride which is exclusively shared among Deaf individuals. Researchers have found that media sources, in the past and present, have portrayed deafness with a negative connotation and as a problem to solve. Additionally, media sources have fed the hearing community unrealistic outcomes of hearing assistive technologies (Saunder, 2016; Fisher, Mirus, & Napoli, 2019). It can be argued that the Hearing community lacks knowledge and acceptance for the Deaf community. Recently, there have been strides for inclusivity of Deaf culture in the mainstream or typically hearing culture (Saunders, 2016). These fads have been incubated through media sharing platforms and partially by higher education institutions offering American Sign Language (ASL) courses (Robinson & Henner, 2018). There are, however, mixed emotions by the Deaf community towards the impacts ASL’s popularity has caused. Robinson and Heener (2018) explain the unjust exploitation of the Deaf students when universities offer ASL courses for hearing individuals, but deprive Deaf students from the same opportunities as hearing students in regards to curriculum, extra-curricular activities, and employment. Research on this topic suggests that more knowledge, acceptance, and inclusion from the hearing community should accompany the current fascination with ASL (Saunder, 2016; Fisher, Mirus, & Napoli, 2019).

In this LSHA poster presentation, the author hopes to spark conversation regarding hearing individuals using ASL and its impacts on Deaf culture and the Deaf community by highlighting perceptions and cultural issues. The presentation will also include current educational, personal, and social barriers faced by the Deaf community. The importance of equal and fair opportunities for Deaf individuals will be highlighted. Everyone wants to be heard, understood, and ultimately treated equally. In order to bridge the gap between the Deaf community’s communication barrier and the hearing community’s exploitation of Deaf culture and ASL, advocacy for Deaf culture is required. ASL should not be the only component of Deaf culture the hearing community grows familiarity to. Acceptance is derived from knowledge, therefore informing hearing individuals of Deaf culture can facilitate equality into mainstream society.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.      Describe educational, academic, personal, and social barriers encountered by the Deaf community.
  • 2.      Consider how ASL usage among typically hearing individuals is perceived by the Deaf community.
  • 3.      Infer methods in which the Hearing community can foster a positive relationship with the Deaf community.


Modern Management of Hearing Loss: Optimizing Patient Outcomes and New Issues from Covid-19 Pandemic

Presenter(s): Dr. Neal Jackson, M.D.

Time: June 3, 2022 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Location: Ballroom

Session Description:  In this session, Dr. Neal Jackson will highlight state of the art management options for patients with hearing loss and discuss new strategies for optimizing hearing outcomes for patients with moderate to profound hearing loss. Dr. Jackson will also review literature and discuss anecdotal lessons learned from patients with hearing loss during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Review the state of the art management options for patients with hearing loss.
  • 2.       Discuss newest strategies for optimizing hearing outcomes with patients with moderate to profound hearing loss.
  • 3.       Review literature and anecdotal lessons learned from patients with hearing loss during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Saturday, June 4, 2022


Person-Centered Care for People Living with Dementia: Insights from and for SLPs

Presenter(s): Dr. Natalie Douglas, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 8:00am - 10:00am

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: People living with dementia or other cognitive impairment comprise the fastest growing caseload for speech-language pathologists. This interactive seminar will describe updates to person-centered, evidence-based treatment approaches for this population while allowing time for specific application to multiple care settings. Tools to support care partners will be emphasized.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will describe three evidence-based, person-centered practices for people living with dementia.
  • 2.       Participants will explain training strategies for professional and family care partners of people living with dementia.
  • 3.       Participants will discuss applications of person-centered care for people living with dementia in their particular service setting.


How to Overcome Myths, Barriers, Misconceptions, and Excuses for Ventilator In-Line Closed Position Valve Applications

Presenter(s): Dr. Kristin Dolan, SLP.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 8:00am - 10:00am

Location: Room 4

Session Description: Speaking valve use was designed to provide speech for long-term tracheostomized patients. But general myths, barriers, and misconceptions regarding when to initiate use limiting the understanding of associated benefits. In-line speaking valve use can promote ventilator weaning and improve rehabilitation including decreased weaning time as well as providing earlier access to verbal communication and swallowing mechanics. Quality of life for both long-term ventilated patient and their families can be easily enhanced with collaborative multidisciplinary services between physician, SLP, RT, PT, OT, and nursing providing early speech opportunities with in-line speaking valve use while still ventilated. A multidisciplinary team, including the SLP, must pose this question: “Are long-term tracheostomized and ventilated patients achieving the best clinical outcomes and getting the best quality of life?” Supervised cuff deflation trials for in-line speaking valve placement with ventilator support can provide speech and dysphagia benefits not just pulmonary benefits. Speaking valve use offers verbal communication, return of normal oropharyngeal physiology/sensation, and subglottic pressurization to maintain swallowing musculature and reduce aspiration risk. Additionally, speaking valve use can expedite toward decannulation BEFORE off vent weaning trials begin utilizing oral airflow for breath support and use of expiratory muscles, improved physiologic PEEP, and cough for secretion management. Education, procedures, protocols, and troubleshooting skills need to be in place to provide a safe environment and physician guided strategy for in-line speaking valve use on ventilator support.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The attendee will be able to identify up to six complications of a tracheostomy tube.
  • 2.       The attendee will be able to identify and provide evidence for common myths, barriers, misconceptions, or excuses to promote speaking valve use.
  • 3.       The attendee will be able to describe an interdisciplinary team approach and identify its primary members.


Connection, Play, and Feeding Therapy: A Guide for the Interaction of Relationship and Play Based Therapy for Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Presenter(s): Erin Forward, MSP, CCC-SLP, CLC

Time: June 4, 2022 - 8:00am - 10:00am

Location: Room 5

Session Description: This course will dive into the importance of play and following a child's lead and interest to build connection in regards to feeding therapy. This course will explore principles of the DIR Floortime evidence-based model, relationship based intervention, as well as other research regarding child led, developmental strategies to incorporate into feeding therapy. Specifically you will learn about the importance relationship plays in the prerequisite skills needed for mealtime, exploration of foods, and development of interoception and internal motivation for PO. This course will provide strategies to build trust with children and families and breakdown aspects of mealtime based on task analysis to develop a holistic plan of care.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Be able to describe 3 ways that affect and relationship can impact a child’s intrinsic motivation to eat.
  • 2.       Be able to describe 3 important aspects of mealtime to consider in regard to a child’s sensory system and other individual differences that may be present.
  • 3.       Be able to describe 3 play strategies to build connection and relationship in feeding sessions and the benefits.


Help for Struggling Readers through the Dubard Association Model

Presenter(s): Alison Webster, M.S., CCC-SLP, CALT-QI, C-SLDS

Time: June 4, 2022 - 8:00am - 9:00am

Location: Room 1

Session Description: A phonetic, multisensory approach to teaching speech, language, and reading has been used successfully with students with severe communication disorders, specific learning disabilities, dyslexia, and students in kindergarten and 1st-grade general education. This presentation will give a history of the development of the DuBard Association Method®, provide multisensory activities for use with students who struggle to read and write, and data from intervention with struggling readers will be presented.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       After this presentation, participants will be able to identify populations of students who benefit from the DuBard Association Method®.
  • 2.       After this presentation, participants will be able to explain the features and language levels of the DuBard Association Method®.
  • 3.       After this presentation, participants will be able to describe multisensory activities that can be used with students who struggle to read and write.


Conversations From the Other Side: CSD Grad Students Guide to Making It not Faking It

Presenter(s): Monica L. Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Dr. Cara E. Tyson, Ph. D., CCC-SLP, Dr. Caprice Lee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 9:10am - 10:10am

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Ever been one to raise your hand and ask that question? Or, you may be the person who needs time to percolate, and the questions come later. For everyone who wished they had asked that question about graduate school but didn’t, this panel is for YOU! Everyone has ‘that’ question that they wish they could ask but felt uncomfortable asking because it may be considered embarrassing or felt foolish because you think you should already know the answer. Here, everything is on the table, and nothing is off limits. Participants are invited to join in on conversations exploring the balancing act of school and life, professional networking, the importance of research, how to talk to your professor, what you can do with your degree, and other aspects of the profession.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will be able to identify healthy communication habits to support academic endeavors and professional development.
  • 2.       Participants will be able to explain the benefits of communication with other professionals to support academic endeavors and enhance professional career development.
  • 3.       Participants will be able to discuss strategies for self-advocacy to enhance professional development and support academic endeavors.


Ethical Considerations in Service Delivery via Telepractice

Presenter(s): Theresa H. Rodgers, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, L-SLP, EdS (LD)

Time: June 4, 2022 – 10:30am – 11:30am

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: The effects on service delivery resulting from the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) were significant and included ethical challenges related to a proliferation in the utilization of telepractice. It is important for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to be proficient in applying the ASHA Code of Ethics as well as state regulatory standards specific to telepractice. Standards and scenarios depicting ethical challenges in the delivery of telepractice will be discussed.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe components of the ASHA Code of Ethics applicable to delivery of services via telepractice.
  • 2.       Discuss regulatory considerations including the impact on telepractice of the Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact.
  • 3.       Analyze scenarios depicting various ethical dilemmas encountered in telepractice.


Dysphagia Following Anterior Disc Fusion (ACDF)

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Edwards, MS, CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 – 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 4

Session Description: In this 1-hour presentation, participants will review indications for ACDF, procedural considerations, typical swallowing-associated implications from the procedure, and evidence supporting management of post-operative dysphagia. The format will feature both didactic and case-study approaches.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.     Learners will be able to state indications for ACDF and overview of the procedure as it relates to swallowing anatomy
  • 2.     Learners will be able to discuss literature surrounding post-operative ACDF dysphagia incidence, severity, and management.
  • 3.     Learners will explain swallowing implications following ACDF based on provided case-study demonstrations.

The Role of Oral Motor in Pediatric Speech and Feeding

Presenter(s): Ashley Pilon, M.S., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 – 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 5

Session Description: Oral motor is a highly debated and divisive topic in the field of speech pathology and has been for many years. How did this argument gain so much momentum in the past? What has changed over the last twenty years? Most SLPs don’t know; they only know what they were taught (or not taught) in school. This divisiveness and conflicting information has left many therapists feeling unequipped to deal with the oral motor aspects of a disorder or to determine when an oral motor approach may be needed. Too often when assessing a child, therapists are ignoring the oral system altogether, whether because of old ideas about oral motor, not feeling confident in conducting an exam or not knowing what to do with the information. Therapists are unclear as to whether oral motor is evidence based and will instead focus on the other aspects of the child’s disorder, neglecting the oral motor needs. This unfortunate trend in our field is leading to children being stuck in therapy for years not being able to “finish” because something is missing. That missing link is often related to the structure and function of the oral motor system. Understanding basic oral motor development and normal patterns of movement is crucial to being able to fully treat speech production and the oral stage of the swallow. It is these specific, precise, coordinated movements that make up our ability to produce speech sounds, breakdown food and swallow. How do we expect to make an accurate differential diagnosis or to be able to plan for treatment appropriately if we aren't able to confidently assess and treat this system? Or worse, what happens if we dismiss it’s significance all together based on old ideas and inconsistent, biased interpretation of oral motor in general? Let’s explore and break down these old ideas of oral motor so that we can take a fresh look at our clients. Let’s further understand typical oral motor development so that we can find the break down in function. Learn how to use critical thinking and clinical judgment to choose treatment options from your “therapy tool box” which isn’t a list of protocols or exercises, but instead an endless supply of ideas to find what works to meet your client’s individual needs.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The learner will recognize oral motor as a crucial piece of the puzzle for pediatric patients and their speech and swallowing development.
  • 2.       The learner will be able to identify simple strategies to assess any child’s oral motor function, no matter their attention, ability to follow directions or ability to imitate movement.
  • 3.       The learner will understand how to weave in oral motor treatment ideas (as needed) to supplement the therapy they are already doing.

The significance of Emotional Intelligence in the context of diversity, equity, inclusion in audiology and speech-language pathology practice

Presenter(s): Dr. Regina Enwefa, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ND, Dr. Stephen Enwefa, Ph.D, CCC-SLP, ND, & Dr. Caprice Lee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 – 10:30am - 11:30am

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Emotions are essential to what it means to be human. As such, the way we conceptualize and treat emotions has decisive implications for our self-understanding and, consequently, for the organization of our coexistence. According to Duggal (2021), the dictionary definition of Emotional Intelligence (EI) “is the capacity to be aware of, control, and express one’s emotions, and to handle interpersonal relationships judiciously and empathetically”. Emotional Intelligence has measurable values that add to the success of organizations in the context of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Achieving work and life balance satisfaction has become one of the most relevant challenges for professionals nowadays. In recent years, emotional intelligence has received much attention in the research literature in many professions. Specifically, what roles does EI play in audiology and speech-language pathology? The education and training in the profession of audiology and speech-language pathology can be associated with academic demands and stressors, increased EI in training programs, and the workplace that may result in better stress coping mechanisms and thereby augment performance and/or lifestyle. The corporate world has embraced the concept of emotional intelligence as a predictor of worker success and success in life; this is less true within the allied health professions where research is lacking. This presentation will define EI and its value in the workplace, identify the five components of EI and discuss the ways to improve EI, and will discuss the importance of individuals’ awareness of their own emotional intelligence. Also, it will outline the advantages of inclusivity. Finally, the presentation will identify the disadvantages of exclusivity.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Define emotional intelligence and its importance.
  • 2.       Identify the ways to improve emotional intelligence.
  • 3.       Identify how emotional intelligence supports diversity, equity, and inclusion in audiology and speech- language pathology practice.


Case Studies in Pediatric Feeding Disorder Assessment and Treatment Across the Continuum of Care

Presenter(s): Dr. Raquel Garcia, SLP.D., CCC-SLP, CLC, CNT, BCS-S & Kristen West, M.A., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 1:00pm- 3:00pm

Location: Room 5

Session Description: The purpose of this presentation is to examine feeding disorders across the continuum of care, starting from infant critical care units through early intervention and the transition to the schools. Different medical co-morbidities will be reviewed that can impact feeding and swallowing development as the child matures. Interdisciplinary team evaluation and treatment/management will be discussed utilizing the PFD lens .Our hope is that sharing clinical cases utilizing our own practice-based evidence along with established evidence-based practice will help clinicians identify the possible challenges for children with feeding disorders across the continuum of care.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Discuss the management of Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD) as they occur across service delivery settings (ICU, Early intervention, Schools).
  • 2.       Connect clinical practices across service delivery settings as it relates to airway safety, nutrition, and oral intake.
  • 3.       Explain ways to improve interprofessional communication across service delivery settings.


To Ph.D. in CSD or Not to Ph.D. in CSD

Presenter(s): Dr. Caprice Lee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Dr. Monica L. Johnson, Ph.D, CCC-SLP, Dr. Cara E. Tyson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Location: Ballroom

Session Description: Currently, there is a shortage of communication sciences and disorders (CSD) professors in the speech-language pathology field (McNeil et al., 2013; Madison et al., 2004; Osmelak, 2019). There is a disproportionate ratio of faculty with PhDs retiring compared to new PhDs entering programs, and 1/3 of faculty openings in CSD between 2012 and 2017 were projected to go unfilled. According to Osmelak (2019), students have been more likely to pursue a PhD in CSD when they have an interest in research, desire for knowledge, and desire to contribute to the SLP discipline. On the other hand, Osmelak (2019) found that the top reasons students do not obtain a PhD are due to lack of research interest, satisfaction with current level of education and job, and the cost of obtaining a doctoral degree.The purpose of this panel discussion is to increase awareness of the opportunity to pursue a PhD in CSD by sharing information and opening the floor for questions related to “What to expect” from a PhD program. The authors will provide a safe judgment-free space for students and professionals to ask burning questions regarding the good, the bad, and the ugly of obtaining a PhD in CSD. Lastly, the authors will share real experiences from their PhD journeys when applicable. Recruitment to PhD programs is relevant now more than ever. For CSD programs to maintain their quality, it is important that the field maintains an adequate number of qualified professionals to train and teach SLPs in training. To facilitate change in the rates in which PhDs in CSD are being pursued, myths of CSD programs must be debunked, funding opportunities must be discussed, an excitement for research must be instilled, and the benefits of being change-agents in our field must be emphasized to students and professionals. 

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Identify potential advantages and disadvantages of obtaining a PhD in CSD.
  • 2.       Discuss financial information such as scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships related to obtaining a Ph.D. in CSD.
  • 3.       Reflect on whether a Ph.D. in CSD is something they deem of interest and a potential future endeavor.


Total Laryngectomy: Continuum of SLP Care

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Edwards, M.S., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Location: Room 4

Session Description: Medical speech-language pathologists working outside of tertiary care centers may infrequently encounter total laryngectomees. Care barriers can arise when patients require or seek care from clinicians with limited knowledge about the changes to breathing, speaking, and swallowing after total laryngectomy (TL). This presentation is designed to provide SLPs of all levels a soup-to-nuts overview of rehabilitation care for laryngectomees. In this presentation, participants can expect to learn about indications for a TL, pre-operative counseling and education, changes to the structure and function of olfaction, respiration, speech, and swallowing, psychosocial implications of a TL, and considerations for the SLP managing communication and swallowing after total laryngectomy across settings including acute care, inpatient rehab, long-term or skilled nursing facilities, and the outpatient clinic. Participants will then learn about communication options available to laryngectomees and will learn about managing voice prosthesis issues, stoma care, and common swallowing problems that can occur following TL.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will understand the changes to breathing, speaking and swallowing as consequence of a total laryngectomy.
  • 2.       Participants will understand how to provide rehabilitation following TL across different care settings.
  • 3.       Participants will learn about to optimize speech-communication and swallowing for patients undergoing TL.


Dynamic Assessment; an appropriate tool for assessing word learning in culturally and linguistically diverse children

Presenter(s): Kwaku Nyantakyi, M.S.

Time: June 4, 2022 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Among the speech-language pathology practice competencies required by the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA), cultural competence seems to be gaining more relevance amid the continually increasing immigrant population in the United States. One way of ensuring culturally competent service delivery is by choosing assessments that are appropriate for persons from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds such as bilingual children. Traditional static assessments of vocabulary have over the past decades proven to be problematic among multicultural children who are learning English alongside another language.

In this talk, I examine the role of dynamic assessment in ensuring a more culturally appropriate assessment for bilingual children in the word learning measure. Two questions are discussed in this talk:

1.        What are the limitations of static assessment in assessing bilingual children?

2.        Why is dynamic assessment a better approach in dealing with bilingual children?

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Understand the differences between static and dynamic assessment.
  • 2.       Understand the limitations of dynamic assessment in assessing bilingual children.
  • 3.       Outline the importance of dynamic assessment in providing a culturally appropriate assessment of bilingual children.


AAC and Social Media: More than Face-to-face Communication

Presenter(s): Dr. Meher Banajee, Ph. D., CCC-SLP, Nataly Mayeaux, B.S., Bianca Canizares, B.S., Maxine Simko, B.A., Madeline Mayes, B.A.

Time: June 4, 2022 - 2:10pm - 3:10pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Young individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) are increasingly attracted to the use of social media for communication.  Their priorities while using AAC have changed.  In addition to face-to-face communication, they demonstrate the need to use social media such as Facebook, What's app, Instagram, etc.  This presentation will demonstrate how AAC users can engage in communication via social media in addition to face-to-face communication through the use of accessible Facebook, Instagram, What's app and other similar apps.  Two cases will be presented where clients expressed a desire to use social media as part of their communication.  Initial evaluation was conducted, funding obtained for the devices and devices were successfully set up for users to access functional communication while using social media.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Participants will learn about change in priorities for individuals who use AAC, including access to social media
  • 2.       Participants will learn about how to access popular social media apps such as Facebook, What's app, etc. through communication devices.
  • 3.       Participants will learn about how to accomplish web browsing and interaction with communication partners via playing games such as Chess and Scrabble. 


Feasibly Implementing FEES

Presenter(s): Hannah Gresham, M.S., CCC-SLP, CBIS

Time: June 4, 2022 - 3:30pm - 5:30pm

Location: Room 4

Session Description: In this presentation, we will discuss the process in which to set up and initiate a FEES program in a hospital-based setting. This includes how to advocate for obtaining objective evaluations of swallowing in a facility, the differences and comparison between MBSS and FEES, how to set up proper disinfection practices, and the benefits to a FEES in an inpatient rehab facility through the review of case studies. We will then discuss the education required in order to determine competency of Speech Language Pathologists.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       The learner will compare MBSS and FEES and identify differences between the two studies.
  • 2.       The learner will state the steps towards setting up a FEES program including physical set up and disinfection procedures as well as education and competency.
  • 3.       The learner will interpret results of a FEES examine presented during case studies in order to describe the benefits of using a FEES in the inpatient rehab and hospital setting.


Connecting the Dots: How Etiologies Drive EBP Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Presenter(s): Michelle Dawson, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Time: June 4, 2022 - 3:30pm - 5:30pm

Location: Room 5

Session Description: There are four components to the diagnosis of pediatric feeding disorder: medical, nutritional, feeding skill, and psychosocial. Each of these components is intricately complex and interwoven into the beautiful tapestry of life that makes up the lives of those we are called to serve.  However, one of these components, “medical”, can be overwhelming to grasp due to limited exposures to pediatric medical aspects within the framework of graduate coursework and limited clinical practicum exposures to working with medically complex children.  The next two hours are a dedicated crash course to build up a PFD clinician’s confidence when it comes to how common medical etiologies can influence evaluation and treatment for PFD.  Topics covered include neurogenic conditions, aerodigestive tract conditions, gastrointestinal conditions, with emphasis placed on learning through laughter and case studies.  So, come with snacks, hypoallergenic gloves, and a healthy dose of curiosity to chase down how an etiology can influence treatment for PFDs! 
Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Describe common neurogenic conditions and how they can influence treatment of a pediatric feeding disorder.
  • 2.       Describe common aerodigestive tract conditions and how they can influence treatment of a pediatric feeding disorder.
  • 3.       Describe common gastrointestinal conditions and how they can influence treatment of a pediatric feeding disorder.


Behavior Management Strategies to Support Speech & Language for Children on the Autism Spectrum

Presenter(s): Dr. Cara E. Tyson, Ph. D, CCC-SLP, Dr. Monica L. Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, & Dr. Caprice Lee, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 3:30pm - 4:30pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: The number of children identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has continuously increased over the last 20 years. Approximately 90% of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) report servicing children on the autism spectrum on their caseloads (Donaldson et al., 2017). This increase in autism prevalence highlights the need for SLPs to enhance their knowledge and understanding of ASD and how to effectively manage challenging behaviors to enhance overall communication in children with autism.

The purpose of this presentation is to broaden understanding of behavior management strategies that can be incorporated into individual and group therapy sessions to enhance meaningful interactions. Behavior management strategies being discussed are those most commonly associated with behavioral psychology. Through this framework, socially significant behaviors are approached by understanding how interactions in the environment supports or impedes communicative behavior (Cardon, 2017). In this presentation, common terminology across professions will be introduced, strategies to understand the influence of the environment on behavior will be reviewed, and strategies to promote and sustain student motivation and engagement will be reviewed.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Critically define and describe autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
  • 2.       Discuss terminology related to communication behavior.
  • 3.       Apply behavior management strategies to increase communication in children on the autism spectrum.


Speechibi: A Novel User-Centered App Designed for the Delivery of Telehealth Speech-Language Services in an Educational Setting

Presenter(s): Leah Singh, M.S., CCC-SLP

Time: June 4, 2022 - 4:40pm - 5:40pm

Location: Room 1

Session Description: Purpose - Although in recent years there has been an increase in the number of web and mobile applications for use by children and adults with communication disorders, there is little research on the efficacy of many of these apps.  The purpose of this single-subject design study is to investigate whether or not a novel digital web-based application (Speechibi) can be utilized as an effective intervention tool for children with speech sound disorders (SSD). 

Method - Four bilingual Hispanic children between ages six through eight with SSD identified through baseline speech-language assessments are participating in this study over a period of 12 weeks.  Data including articulatory improvement through  and user engagement will be analyzed.  Traditional articulation therapy is supplemented with the Speechibi app  in order to provide engaging visual animated models of speech sound productions for participants.

Limitations and future research directions will also be discussed, including the importance of investigating how the new application can be integrated into a more comprehensive speech and language intervention program.

Result-This study is ongoing and will be complete at the end of May 2022.

Conclusion-This study is ongoing and will be complete at the end of May 2022.

Learner Objectives:

  • 1.       Obtain and apply knowledge of information on a novel, high-tech approach using a browser-based app (accessible through browsers like Google, Safari, etc. on desktop computers, laptops, iPad/tablets and mobile phones) that can be used as an educational tool to enhance the remediation or as an addition to traditional treatment for speech sound and language disorders in various clinical and research settings.
  • 2.       Understand and apply knowledge of how ASHA’s NOMS can be used to collect data using the app for speech sound disorders (ex.: /r/ Phoneme - Remediation of prevocalic and postvocalic /r/).
  • 3.       Understand and apply knowledge of how digitalization and gamification for educational purposes can enhance more traditional and low-tech methods of delivering speech and language services with digital learning experiences using the Speechibi (and other speech and language-based) browser-based apps and resources. 


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